IN MEMORY OF EUNICE MCMICHEN

McMichin2


2006

IN MEMORY OF EUNICE MCMICHEN
by Asa Faith (Bobo) Randolph
Crossing the Bar
by Alfred Lord Tennyson

Sunset and evening star,
And one clear call for me!
And may there be no moaning of the bar,
When I put out to sea,

But such a tide as moving seems asleep,
Too full for sound and foam,
When that which drew from out the boundless deep
Turns again home.

Twilight and eveing bell,
And after that the dark!
And may there be no sadness of farewell,
When I embark;

For tho'from out our bourne of Time and Place
The flood may bear me far,
I hope to see my Pilot face to face
When I have crossed the bar.

I chose this poem in remembrance of Mrs. McMichen because I learned it and recited it in her class in my senior year, 1961. I have never forgotten it. I will never forget her. Asa Faith


A Tribute to Mrs. McMichen by Jerry Grammer

After reading Asa faith’s memoirs of Mrs. McMichen, I reached inside my pea brain for a poem I learned and recited in her class. It came to me; so I wrote it down.

Mrs. McMichen was one of my favorite teachers. My last year in Sumiton Jr High, I was chosen to write something and speak at the fall festival at DHS. Afterwards, Mrs. McMichen came up to me and said: I can hardly wait until next year. You will be my favorite student! I probably let her down, however, she never let me down!

(Thank you
Asa for the inspiration)

Jerry Grammer

Epilogue to Asolando

At the midnight in the silence of the sleep-time,

When you set your fancies free,

Will they pass to where-by death, fools think, imprisoned

Low he lies who once so loved you, whom you loved so,

-Pity me?

Oh to love so, be so loved, yet so mistaken!

What had I on earth to do

With the slothful, with the mawkish, the unmanly?

Like the aimless, helpless, hopeless, did I drivel

-Being-who?

One who never turned his back but marched breast forward,

Never doubted clouds would break,

Never dreamed, though right were worsted, wrong would

triumph,

Held we fall to rise, are baffled to fight better,

Sleep to wake.

No, at noonday in the bustle of man's work-time

Greet the unseen with a cheer!

Bid him forward, breast and back as either should be,

"Strive and thrive!" cry "Speed,-fight on, fare ever

There as here!"

ROBERT BROWNING

MRS. MCMICHEN: A LADY
by Dan Nix, class of '61


When I heard about Mrs. McMichen's death, the first image that came to me was that of a true lady.

I can remember walking down the hall at Dora High School and seeing at a distance, someone with perfect posture. No doubt about it - that was Mrs. McMichen. As she approached me, I could see clearly her neat, well-groomed appearance. She always looked that way.

Another memory is that of her professional manner. Her purpose was clear to us. She was there to teach and we were there to learn. We knew, without a doubt, that she was in control of the class. It was not control based on fear; it was based on concern and respect for us.

One of my special memories of Mrs. McMichen really had an impact on me. On May 19, 1961, 120 seniors had dressed in our graduation gowns and helped each other put our mortar boards on straight - just as she requested. Right before we lined up for the processional, she said, "This is the last time you will be together. Many of you will not see each other again."

Yesterday, at her funeral, those words were with me. I will never forget the truth in those words, and I will never forget the lady who spoke them.
Dan

By Rick Watson
Mrs. McMichen an Extraordinary Teacher
Mrs. McMichen was an English teacher at Dora High School for many years. The impact she had on students who passed through those halls was remarkable. Many have told me that once they completed her classes that English 101 in college was a breeze. I wouldn’t know because I dodged Mrs. McMichen. I went to summer school one year so that I could graduate from high school a year early and one of the classes I took was senior English. It was by design. Everyone had told me that she was a bear in class and since I was loading up to get out early, I didn’t want to fail English. That was one of those life choices I lived to regret. I have struggled with English all my life. I failed freshman English in college once. I dropped out failing a second time and only on the third attempt did I squeak by. To further drive home the error, I decided later in life that I actually loved writing and what I didn’t know did hurt me.
The sad part for me is that I’ve always loved Mrs. McMichen. Her mother and father lived across the road from my family in West Pratt and they were the neatest people. I often went across the road in the summertime and sat on the porch and drank lemonade with Mr. and Mrs. Galloway. The house was always white as a church and the floors had a fresh coat of grey paint. The hedges were always trimmed to perfection and their yard looked like it was kept by the grounds keeper at Augusta Country Club.
Later when I got old enough to drive, I cut grass for people in the area. One of my clients was Mrs. McMichen. She had a small yard, but it was steeper than the ski slope in Gatlinburg. I cut the front with a rope tied to the handle of the lawnmower…pulling it up and letting it down with the rope. Mrs. McMichen would always say “I can’t wait to have you in my class.” She was a petite and gracious woman who spoke impeccable English. I never heard her raise her voice. When she would have to put someone in line, her voice would get stern and you knew she meant business.
I had the good sense in later years to visit with her mom and dad before they passed away and record them talking about how they met and how they come to live in West Pratt. I later gave that tape to Mrs. McMichen and she thanked me every time she saw me for that simple act.
In thinking about the past, I have very few regrets. The decision to take senior English in summer school and dodge her is one I do regret because I truly believe she would have made my path easier.
Mrs. McMichen passed away on December 24th 2005. As her spirit ascends to that higher place she can go with the knowledge that during her time here on earth she made a profound impact on my life and the lives of countless others who knew and loved her.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Aenean commodo ligula eget dolor. Aenean massa. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Donec quam felis, ultricies nec, pellentesque eu, pretium quis, sem. Nulla consequat massa quis enim.

Mrs. McMichen an Extraordinary Teacher
Mrs. McMichen was an English teacher at Dora High School for many years. The impact she had on students who passed through those halls was remarkable. Many have told me that once they completed her classes that English 101 in college was a breeze. I wouldn’t know because I dodged Mrs. McMichen. I went to summer school one year so that I could graduate from high school a year early and one of the classes I took was senior English. It was by design. Everyone had told me that she was a bear in class and since I was loading up to get out early, I didn’t want to fail English. That was one of those life choices I lived to regret. I have struggled with English all my life. I failed freshman English in college once. I dropped out failing a second time and only on the third attempt did I squeak by. To further drive home the error, I decided later in life that I actually loved writing and what I didn’t know did hurt me.
The sad part for me is that I’ve always loved Mrs. McMichen. Her mother and father lived across the road from my family in West Pratt and they were the neatest people. I often went across the road in the summertime and sat on the porch and drank lemonade with Mr. and Mrs. Galloway. The house was always white as a church and the floors had a fresh coat of grey paint. The hedges were always trimmed to perfection and their yard looked like it was kept by the grounds keeper at Augusta Country Club.
Later when I got old enough to drive, I cut grass for people in the area. One of my clients was Mrs. McMichen. She had a small yard, but it was steeper than the ski slope in Gatlinburg. I cut the front with a rope tied to the handle of the lawnmower…pulling it up and letting it down with the rope. Mrs. McMichen would always say “I can’t wait to have you in my class.” She was a petite and gracious woman who spoke impeccable English. I never heard her raise her voice. When she would have to put someone in line, her voice would get stern and you knew she meant business.
I had the good sense in later years to visit with her mom and dad before they passed away and record them talking about how they met and how they come to live in West Pratt. I later gave that tape to Mrs. McMichen and she thanked me every time she saw me for that simple act.
In thinking about the past, I have very few regrets. The decision to take senior English in summer school and dodge her is one I do regret because I truly believe she would have made my path easier.
Mrs. McMichen passed away on December 24th 2005. As her spirit ascends to that higher place she can go with the knowledge that during her time here on earth she made a profound impact on my life and the lives of countless others who knew and loved her.

Back to menu

Donate

Follow Us

Facebook